Posts Tagged ‘fdr’

Today I had the pleasure of interviewing David Stockman.  He is a former Congressman from Michigan, former Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Ronald Reagan, and former partner at The Blackstone Group.  Stockman is the author of The Triumph of Politics: Why the Reagan Revolution Failed (1986) and 2013’s The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America.  On the show today we discussed how some of his work traces “historical dominoes.”  It was fascinating to learn how certain events in history led to others and so on, until we wind up with thus and so…  For example: how did the creation of the Fed in 1913 lead to the 2008 crisis?  What was the chain of events?  Find out in today’s episode.

David Stockman’s Contra Corner

http://www.amazon.com/Great-Deformation-Corruption-Capitalism-America/dp/1586489127/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418358518&sr=8-1&keywords=the+great+deformation&pebp=1418358520995

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By: bionic mosquito

I have commented previously that I believe (at least given my current understanding) the main purpose for U.S. entry into the war was two-fold: 1) to take the place of an increasingly ailing Britain as the primary tool for the elite to expand global control, and 2) to ensure a new, long term enemy can be made out of the Soviet Union and communism. I will add a third to this list – actually it is a subset of the first: to bring the productive populations of Germany and Japan under the control of the elite.

Before I expand on this further, I would like to revisit some of the factors regarding the war and why it is not just improper, but inconceivable to refer to this was as a good war.

1) Roosevelt lied to the country regarding his intentions of entering the war.

2) Roosevelt took great strides to get first Germany, and after failing this, Japan, to strike the first blow.

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Please check out this episode where we discuss FDR, The New Deal, The Great Depression… and Calvin Coolidge:

 

We must consider the source when we consider the things we were taught growing up in public (government) schools. In a hypothetical true free society where government did not monopolize the school system, we would be much more likely to learn a fair and accurate presentation of facts. This is true of any subject but is most applicable when we’re talking about history. History is largely in the eye of the beholder. There are facts and dates that cannot be debated. But history is more about the why than the when. This is where the perspective of the presenter comes into play. Take 9/11 for example. Depending on who taught the subject, one may get very different explanations as to the cause. A pro-government leaning teacher may say we were attacked because the terrorists hated our freedom and our wealth. They attacked us out of jealousy basically. Another, more impartial teacher may say we were attacked as retaliation for our incessant meddling in the Middle East. Same event, same dates, same number of dead, but very different explanations of the most important lesson: the cause.

The standard account of the Great Depression we got (and still get) growing up illustrates just one of many inaccurate portrayals of historical events regurgitated in government schools. The popular, public school account goes something like this: the unfettered capitalistic, animalistic excesses of the 1920’s resulted in a horrific crash in 1929 that led to the Great Depression. And the do-nothing Herbert Hoover allowed the Depression to continue and worsen while the masses were starving. Roosevelt, with all of his grand programs, put Americans back to work and eventually pulled us out of the Depression. (more…)

So today is Presidents’ Day and I’d be remiss if I didn’t give a quick shout out to some of our most awesomest rulers to date. Lord Acton said, “Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men.” I tend to agree. The only question is are these men bad dudes who rise to power? Or does the power pervert normal politicians? Does it matter? I guess that was three questions. We have had several good Presidents throughout our history but that’s a boring topic. Today I want to celebrate Presidents’ Day by telling you about the bad ones. Some of these will surprise you. (more…)