Archive for the ‘history’ Category

By: Thomas DiLorenzo

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the end of the American “civil War,” more accurately described as the War to Prevent Southern Independence.  It is also the 31st anniversary of the movie, The Godfather, Part II.  A single scene in the movie illustrates the true cause of the “Civil War.”

 The scene in question involves a Hells Kitchen New York Mafia boss in the early twentieth century named Don Fanucci, whose character is based on a real-life Mafia boss named Ignazio Lupo (“Lupo the Wolf”).  In the scene Don Fanucci meets with a young Vito Corleone (who would later become “The Godfather”) after discovering that young Vito and some friends had been quite successful operating as thieves in the neighborhood.  The purpose of the meeting was to extort money from the young Mafia wannabes since that, after all, was a big part of the “business” the Mafia was in at the time.  Don Fanucci (and Ignazio Lupo) would go to all business people in Hell’s Kitchen and essentially say, “If you want to do business in ‘my’ neighborhood, you’ll have to give me a percentage – or else.”  (Ignazio Lupo meant business; he is “credited” with at least 60 murders).  Here is what Don Fannucci said to Vito Corleone, from the script of The Godfather, Part II:   (more…)

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By: Tom DiLorenzo

November and December of this year mark the 150th anniversary of General William Tecumseh Sherman’s famous “march to the sea” at the end of the War to Prevent Southern Independence.  The Lincoln cult – especially its hyper-warmongering neocon branch – has been holding conferences, celebrations, and commemorations while continuing to rewrite history to suit its statist biases.  Business as usual, in other words.  But they are not the only ones writing about the event.  Historian Karen Stokes has published South Carolina Civilians in Sherman’s Path: Stories of Courage Amid Civil War Destruction that contains a great deal of very telling information about Sherman’s motivation in waging total war on the civilianpopulation of South Carolina.

Stokes begins by quoting a letter that Sherman wrote to General Henry Halleck shortly before invading all-but-defenseless South Carolina:  “[T]he whole army is burning with an insatiable desire to wreak vengeance upon South Carolina.”  In another message a few weeks later, Sherman reiterated to Halleck that “The whole army is crazy to be turned loose in [South] Carolina.” (more…)

By: Tom DiLorenzo

“[F]rom the military policies of Sherman and Sheridan there lies but an easy step to the total war of the Nazis, the greatest affront to Western civilization since its founding.”

–Richard M. Weaver, The Southern Essays of Richard M.

Weaver, pp. 168-169.

Having lied about secession, states’ rights, the origins of the Constitution, Lincoln, and just about everything having to do with the American “Civil War” for many generations, the Lincoln cult is now hard at work on its biggest lie of all: that General William Tecumseh Sherman’s famous “march to the sea” did not negatively affect Southern civilians or their property.

In a November 14 New York Times article one Alan Blinder wrote of “an expanding body of more forgiving scholarship about the general’s behavior.” In its ten thousandth attempt (at least) to mentally “reconstruct” Southerners, the government-funded Georgia Historical Society, in cahoots with the Jimmy Carter Presidential Museum, recently paced a marker in Atlanta “near the picnic tables at the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum” that is supposedly “a reassessment of Sherman” that has been “decades in the making” by the Lincoln cult. (more…)

By: Tom DiLorenzo

Several times a week I force myself to be subjected to five minutes or so of neocon chatter by Rush Limbaugh, Marc Levin (“The Grate One”), Sean Hannity, or the FAUX News Channel morning show. Their bloviations are filled with extreme hypocrisy and delusional contradictions.

For example, during the Bush administration the neocon mantra was “9/11 changed everything!” by which they meant, “to hell with the Constitution.” Whenever Judge Andrew Napolitano would challenge any of his FAUX News Channel colleagues over warrantless wiretaps, NSA spying, undeclared and unconstitutional wars, torturing of prisoners, the murder-by-drone of American citizens, etc., this was their mantra, their all-purpose slogan designed to censor all discussion. “Constitution Schmonstitution” was their unofficial motto.

Now that a Democrat is in the White House that has all changed. Marc Levin, who slavishly supported Bush’s “War on Terra” and all of its constitutional subversions, has even written a very silly book on the importance of sticking to the Constitution. His fellow neocons all sounded more like Mussolini than (James) Madison during the Bush administration but today they have all become born-again constitutionalists. At least until the next Republican is elected president. (more…)

By: Thomas J. DiLorenzo
Posted with Author’s Permission

When the Washington Post reviewed Martin Scorsese’s movie “The Gangs of New York,” which included a reasonably-accurate portrayal of the 1863 New York City draft riots (see Iver Bernstein, The New York City Draft Riots), the Post’s reviewer expressed astonishment upon learning that such an event had occurred. “We were all taught in school that there was national unity during the Civil War,” he opined.

Of course, there is never “national unity” about anything, especially war, democratic politics being what it is. When is the last time you heard of a unanimous vote expressing national unity in the U.S. Congress about anything? Even the vote to declare war on Japan after Pearl Harbor was not unanimous. (more…)

Whether you’re anti-war or not, shouldn’t we always exhaust all possibilities before bombing innocent civilians? Why were we not taught in school that the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was an awful and inhumane thing?

Check out this great little piece by my boy, bionic mosquito:

Truman Knew

On Independence Day, I had the opportunity to chat with Kmele Foster of Fox Business’ The Independents and Freethink Media. We talked about Kmele’s path to libertarianism and to television. We talked about the founders and whether we’ve retained their principles or abandoned them altogether. At times our “movement” can tend to have a negative outlook on our future. The biggest thing I took away from my chat with Kmele is that there is a lot to be optimistic about… which was definitely refreshing for a change.

Also, here are links to the films Kmele mentions in the interview:

http://www.amazon.com/Honor-Flight-Bert-Brach/dp/B00BU984DK/ref=sr_1_1?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1405045292&sr=1-1&keywords=honor+flight+the+movie

http://www.amazon.com/2081-based-Vonneguts-22Harrison-Bergeron-22/dp/B002Y2BDEE

Submitted by Dirk Tripp, former Marine.

The American experience in Vietnam once had a real bite to it. Second only to the Civil War in the way it affected the American psyche. These two wars go hand in hand in that respect, for they were both firsts when it came to seeing the blood, and guts, and bones of dead Americans in living color. After the Civil War we sure kept waging war on the Native Americans, but after Vietnam we actually stopped the killing for a minute, took a pause, and actually reflected on what we had done. (more…)

Dinesh D’Souza is a conservative author and filmaker. He made big waves with his 2012 documentary, 2016: Obama’s America. He is now promoting his new film, America: Imagine the World Without Her. He was kind enough to take a few minutes out of his crazy schedule to talk about the movie and discuss a few issues with us. Enjoy…

Coming up in the next 2 weeks, Political Badger talks with Amity Shlaes, Ed Krayewski, Dinesh D’Souza, Kmele Foster and Marc Faber. Please stay tuned!!!

Many of you have read his pieces on his blog bionic mosquito. You have seen his stuff all over the place: on lew rockwell, economic policy journal, lions of liberty

After hearing some talking head on CNBC refer to Ron Paul as a mosquito, the author thought to himself, “If Ron Paul is a Mosquito, he is a powerful one.” Hence the name. Jonathan Goodwin is bionic mosquito and was kind enough to give us a peek into his not-so-mosquito-sized brain.

Political Badger: What was the impetus for starting your blog?

Bionic Mosquito: I had been thinking about doing something like this for quite some time. I thought it would be a good way for me to improve my thinking on several subjects – economics, libertarianism, politics, and empire (I think history wasn’t originally on my mind); I am not trained in any of these. I felt that the act of writing, and posting it publicly, would force an improvement of discipline in my thought. I also thought that receiving feedback online would be a wonderful, free, learning tool. Finally, I wanted to document my own learning / progression.

But what drove me finally to take the step was a minor technical problem (you asked). For a time I was a regular feed-backer at The Daily Bell. Early on, I was not able to post a comment of more than a few characters (it turned out to be a browser problem on my end). In order to get around this, I would post my longer comments on my blog, and DB graciously copied the comments from my blog to their thread.

Pretty dull, I know.

PB: When did it really take off?

BM: Have you looked at the alexa ratings? “Take off” is not a phrase I would use, but thank you.

I guess bionic mosquito first started gaining some recognition (beyond the comments section of Daily Bell, EPJ, and Mises) when Lew Rockwell ran a post a couple of years ago – something I wrote about Pearl Harbor, based on a book by George Victor, “The Pearl Harbor Myth: Rethinking the Unthinkable”. Since then, Lew has re-posted many of my blog posts, as has Robert Wenzel at EPJ and Marc Clair at Lions of Liberty. A few other sites occasionally pick up a post as well.

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Submitted by Dirk Trip, former Marine.

Does anybody out there remember the horrible tension and fear that existed during the height of the Cold War? As a six year boy I sat down with a Coke and a smile and watched the movie “The Day After.” I was accustomed to war movie heroes like Alvin C. York and Audie Murphy and my mind had already been programed to aspire to be a famous American infantry fighter. “The Day After” is a movie about an all-out thermonuclear war, and immediately I understood that there would be no heroes in the case of such a war, only the dead, dying, and soon to be dying.

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Agree or disagree with Dr. Ron Paul, you have to admire his gigantic sack. Watch this clip from the 2008 republican debate in SC. Most politicians would wilt here. Imagine the guts it takes to tell an auditorium full of blood-thirsty, war-mongering neo-cons that our foreign policy contributed to 9/11 and that we should not be at war in Iraq.

We must consider the source when we consider the things we were taught growing up in public (government) schools. In a hypothetical true free society where government did not monopolize the school system, we would be much more likely to learn a fair and accurate presentation of facts. This is true of any subject but is most applicable when we’re talking about history. History is largely in the eye of the beholder. There are facts and dates that cannot be debated. But history is more about the why than the when. This is where the perspective of the presenter comes into play. Take 9/11 for example. Depending on who taught the subject, one may get very different explanations as to the cause. A pro-government leaning teacher may say we were attacked because the terrorists hated our freedom and our wealth. They attacked us out of jealousy basically. Another, more impartial teacher may say we were attacked as retaliation for our incessant meddling in the Middle East. Same event, same dates, same number of dead, but very different explanations of the most important lesson: the cause.

The standard account of the Great Depression we got (and still get) growing up illustrates just one of many inaccurate portrayals of historical events regurgitated in government schools. The popular, public school account goes something like this: the unfettered capitalistic, animalistic excesses of the 1920’s resulted in a horrific crash in 1929 that led to the Great Depression. And the do-nothing Herbert Hoover allowed the Depression to continue and worsen while the masses were starving. Roosevelt, with all of his grand programs, put Americans back to work and eventually pulled us out of the Depression. (more…)

Submitted by Dirk Trip, Former Marine

Dwight D. Eisenhower, one of the most iconic military leaders in all of human history, left the American people a clearly defined warning about the dangers of an unchecked military industrial complex.

As it stands now, not only do we not like Ike, we’ve set the poor general to spinning in his grave like a drill bit. Our military industrial complex has gone beyond unchecked, it has grown into some sort of immeasurable colossus that gobbles up money like nothing ever before in human history. We never really took our foot off of the gas pedal when it comes to our defense spending, so I guess, F-U Ike, thanks for your service though…

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So today is Presidents’ Day and I’d be remiss if I didn’t give a quick shout out to some of our most awesomest rulers to date. Lord Acton said, “Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men.” I tend to agree. The only question is are these men bad dudes who rise to power? Or does the power pervert normal politicians? Does it matter? I guess that was three questions. We have had several good Presidents throughout our history but that’s a boring topic. Today I want to celebrate Presidents’ Day by telling you about the bad ones. Some of these will surprise you. (more…)